Legal-Ease: Saving money and natural resources

Over the last few decades, conservation of our natural resources has become more popular. Even the most cynical people are beginning to accept that human activity is having at least some impact on the planet.

The government program over the last few decades that most encouraged natural resource conservation in rural areas has been the Conservation Reserve Program. The CRP is administered by the USDA.

Land enrolled in CRP or similar government programs results in government payments in exchange for landowners agreeing to not commercial farm or develop specific land.

The federal government also encourages conservation by limiting the clearing of woods and fencerows in the region if they’re determined to be wetlands. You can read more about unauthorized clearing of woods and fencerows in this previous post.

Our society’s passion for conservation tends to ebb and flow. However, over the last several decades, conservation of our natural resources overall has slowly become more popular. Despite initially justifiable skepticism of “global warming,” even the most cynical among us are beginning to accept the reality that some human activity is having at least some impact on how our planet functions.

Over the last 30 years, the government program that most encouraged natural resource conservation in rural areas has been the Conservation Reserve Program, which is administered by the USDA. Acreage enrolled in CRP or similar state and federal programs provide payments to landowners in exchange for the landowners agreeing to refrain from commercially farming or developing certain land.

Read more about ways in which the government encourages conservation of our natural resources in Lee’s post in the Lima News here: Legal-Ease: Saving money and natural resources

Source: LimaOhio.com, “Legal-Ease: Saving money and natural resources,” by Lee R. Schroeder, December 9, 2017

Lee R. Schroeder is an Ohio licensed attorney at Schroeder Law LLC in Putnam County. He limits his practice to business, real estate, estate planning and agriculture issues in northwest Ohio. He can be reached at [email protected] or at 419-659-2058. This article is not intended to serve as legal advice, and specific advice should be sought from the licensed attorney of your choice based upon the specific facts and circumstances that you face.

Posted in Agriculture and tagged .