Legal-Ease: Ohio bicycle laws

While many of Ohio’s laws concerning roadways apply to bicycles, there are some laws interpreted differently for bicycles and some laws that are specific to bicycles only. Bicycles aren’t allowed on all Ohio roadways, including freeways. Bicycles must be operated at safe speeds based on the context of the road and other traffic. There are several other laws that bicyclists should keep in mind while on Ohio’s roadways. 

Legal-Ease: What to do when the plan fails

Successful people both plan for success and for less-than-ideal circumstances. When a plan fails, it’s important to engage in three big steps. First, don’t just bury your head in the sand. Second, be proactive and gets plans in place early. Finally, be open-minded and be willing to accept help from others. 

Legal-Ease: Grass clippings on roadways

Property owners often blow their grass clippings on roadways, and a problem may arise if the grass clippings cause an accident. Some research suggests that grass clippings can be as slippery as grease is on roads, and clippings can be especially dangerous for motorcycles. Ohio does not have laws that explicitly prohibit property owners from blowing grass clippings onto roadways. An Ohio law makes it illegal to place injurious materials onto roads. But this law doesn’t cover glass clippings. 

Legal-Ease: Buying or selling over time

Businesses and individuals often want to buy or sell something over time. There are four items to consider when entering into a sale or purchase “over time.” First, if the sale includes a house or land with a house, it may be referred to as a “land contract,” which requires numerous legal requirements. Second, if the subject of the purchase is real estate that isn’t a house, the buyer and seller can agree to almost any terms they want. Third, if the subject of the purchase isn’t real estate, and it’s personal property, the buyer and seller can be flexible in terms as long as the personal property isn’t a retail item. Finally, every installment sale should be reviewed by the buyer and seller’s tax advisers. 

Legal-Ease: Walk this way

Ohio has several laws to govern pedestrian traffic, and many communities have their own additional laws and ordinances as well. Pedestrians must obey all pedestrian traffic-control signals. Sometimes people can become confused over how to handle pedestrians at intersections with stopped vehicular traffic. 

Legal-Ease: Giving our lives one good deed at a time

Some people may avoid helping others with the concern that they may make the situation worse. For this reason, the law often includes “good Samaritan” protections to people who are trying to help others. Ohio law is general and comprehensive when it comes to help during emergencies and disasters. 

Legal-Ease: Hire the right professional from the start

When someone is hired to do a job that they’re not qualified to perform, the result can be disappointing. There can be recovery, though, in many instances in which shoddy goods or services were provided. 

Hiring the right professional from the start will ultimately save both time and money rather than getting stuck with cleaning up the mess from a poorly done job. 

Legal-Ease: Spring cleaning and trash fires

As spring cleaning is upon us, many in our region will want to burn combustible trash outside. In the state of Ohio, no burning is allowed between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. in the months of March, April, May, October and November unless the fire is in a plowed field. These months of the year are particularly dangerous for outdoor fires. 

Ohio has a number of laws in place for burning outside, and municipalities and counties often regulate fires as well. 

Legal-Ease: Caring for adult children with special needs

When children with intellectual and developmental disabilities become adults, unique challenges can present themselves.

If the adult with a disability is mentally competent as a matter of law, he or she may be able to sign powers of attorney that name family and friends as agents. If the adult is not legally competent mentally to sign powers of attorney, parents or other members of the family should undertake a formal guardianship proceeding.

Legal-Ease: Warranties and out-of-business retailers

When a business closes, its commitments are typically canceled along with the business itself. So, for example, a retailer that closes down may have the ability to walk away from its property lease. This applies to contracts with other vendors as well. 

Among contracts that a business may walk away from upon closure are warranties. Warranty liability for closed businesses usually will break out into two categories.